2020 Toyota Corolla Sedan, Land Rover Reliability and will our Electric Future be Boring? [Ask Nathan]

tatra prague to pebble or bust video project kickstarter reward

  • What is going on with the 2020 Toyota Corolla Sedan?
  • Is Land Rover/Range Rover reliable?
  • Is our electric future going to be boring?

The first question comes from a Toyota fan who wants to know the latest on the 2020 Toyota Corolla Sedan.

This Toyota Corolla is a concept from last year

Hi Nathan and Roman! I’m a Toyota fan and have never been let down. I want to know if you have any details on the 2020 Toyota Corolla sedan.

I have driven Corollas (and the Matrix, which is a Corolla as far as I am concerned) for over 30 years and I have never experienced a breakdown. Sometimes there is a glitch like my 2009 had a issue with the radio XM dieing, but that was fixed at the dealership.

My partner is the same way with her Honda Civic, but she has had tons of problems by comparison. Since the early 1980s, I have purchased seven Corollas and only get rid of them when they reach over one hundred thousand miles. My dad had one of the older Corolla hatch backs that had rear drive. That’s the car I learned how to drive in. He loved it so much, he even kept it after it was run into. It still ran, but the platform was bent and it drove weird. We finally donated it about 15 years ago. It still ran!

I like the videos you published on the hatchback, but I want to know more about the sedan. I am assuming it’s coming out in 2020 because my dealer in Northridge (California) mentioned it. They watch your channel too! Anyway, they said that it would be about a year after the hatch back debuts before the 2020 Toyota Corolla sedan debuts.

Can you please tell me what you know? I truly like watching all of your channels and I appreciate the hard work you guys pout into everything you do. Even when I disagree with you (I liked the Aztek you hated so much) I still think you guys rock!

Amy P

A: Hi Amy!

Thank you so much for your email. Loved reading about your history with the Corolla; I had a (very) used ’81 in college and it was terrific! There are lots of tidbits floating around regarding the 2020 Toyota Corolla sedan.

  • Here are a few possibilities for the 2020 Toyota Corolla sedan based on the most recent information available:
  • It will look a lot like the hatchback – Spy shots of the test vehicle clearly show a strong family resemblance to the hatchback.
  • Stick? Maybe. Dual-clutch? Probably not – The same continuously variable transmission (CVT) with the additional launch gear, should show up. Toyota may build a limited number of entry-level Corolla sedans that might come with the same manual that’s offered in the hatchback.
  • Brakes? Toyota may finally add four-wheel disc brakes as standard – maybe.
  • It will be based on a all-new platform – Toyota will base it on the TNGA modular platform. It’s the same platform as the hatchback, Prius, Camry and C-HR – among others.
  • The 2020 Toyota Corolla sedan should have more powertrain options – Rumor has it that Toyota will be aggressively pursuing electrification across the board. That means a lot more hybrids and plug-in hybrids as well. The TNGA platform has already proven capable of housing various hybrid options. Also, the Corolla Hatchback has provisions for hybrid power overseas. It should be an option in the next generation Corolla sedan in the near future.
  • No diesel Corolla – Diesels are almost certainly not coming to the United States. Toyota has avoided diesels in this market and, whether we like it or not, they appear to be continuing that staredgy.
  • We expect to see the debut of the 2020 Toyota Corolla at one of the next few major North American auto shows. I’m betting on Los Angeles in November, but the 2019 NAIAS is a good bet too.

Considering that the Toyota Corolla is one of the best selling vehicles on the planet, I suspect Toyota is sweating all of the details to make sure it’s a proper replacement for the current model.

Can’t wait to see!

N


This next question comes from a fan who wants to know if Land Rover/Range Rover is a reliable buy.

RR-Evoque-Conv-LSF-TD

Nathan,

Love tflcar, y’all keep up the good work! I was emailing you about Land Rover SUVs.

I live in an area where hurricanes are common and need an SUV that could get me out of a sticky situation. I love, love , love the look of all Landys, especially the RR Sport, RR, and RR Evoque. I would mainly be interested in the Evoque. I have watched every review on it and have researched it heavily and want your honest opinion – is this vehicle worth it. LR has had reliability issues, but have they gotten better over the years? Also, could this tiny RR get me out of something if I needed it to? As experts who tests these SUVs regularly, I would love the feedback!

Y’all rock!

N

A: Hi and thanks for the email!

While Land Rover and Range Rover’s reliability reputation isn’t very good, I still consider just about everything they build to be remarkably off-road worthy. With the proper tires, they should perform brilliantly in snow.

I have a friend who has a 2015 Range Rover Sport. He’s reported on no problems and it has over 60,000 miles on it. I also have a cousin who reported nothing but problems with her 2016 LR4. She bought hers used – which might be saying something.

Some of this might be subjective;  but it seems that some folks who purchased their Land Rover/Range Rover new seem to have better luck with them. It makes sense.

In the end, I know that fans of Rover products can be rather devoted and will counter the reliability issues with the joy of driving their vehicles over impossible terrain. Plus, they are cool rides – right?

In the end, it depends on what is important to you. For me? I would make sure I had a beefy warranty before buying.

Cheers!

N


The last question is about how boring some people think future electric cars will be.

I know that The Fast Lane is beginning to talk more and more about electric cars.   

I see more and more car makers talking about electrifying cars very soon. I guess I don’t mind the idea of electric cars. I get the idea of cleaner cars and all, but I think many of the new car designs are kind of boring.

Don’t you think so?

Darren in the UpI

A:Greetings Darren!

I onced thought the same way you do. I saw a sea of concepts that, while sleek, lacked personality. Recently, a few automakers have toyed with cool-looking retro-futuristic designs that, I think, are super cool. The cool thing about electric cars is that there is a ton of space for unique designs.

The car I featured on this post is the Nobe 100. This is a crowd-funded proposal for a three-wheeled electric car that has late 50’s/early 60’s design cues, yet, it’s totally electric (it’s three-wheel drive with an electric motor in each wheel!) holds three people and should be affordable.

All that is based on if it will be built. Check out the Nobe 100 GO-FUND-ME page (here).

The bottom line is: to me, Nobe is on to something here. People in the near future will want boutique/unique looking cars that say something about their personalities, even if they are partially automated/autonomous. Honda is showing off cool concepts that have a retro look as well.

2017 honda sports ev concept
Honda Sport EV concept

I hope more cars like this make it to production.

Speaking of electifying vehicles…

Nathan and The Fast Lane Car team are here to answer your (reasonable) questions. Interesting and/or entertaining emails will be posted to this column. If it’s relevant in the automotive universe, there’s a chance we may know something about it. The author’s email address and name will be omitted – leaving your initials or nickname, your preference.From day one, The Fast Lane Car has made it our policy to answer as many questions and comments as we can. We get thousands of emails and comments and feel that, as part of a tight-knit automotive community, having an open dialogue with you keeps things fresh and exciting.Got a question for Nathan? Drop him a line at: asknathan@tflcar.com.

Nathan Adlen
Easily amused by anything with four wheels, Nathan Adlen reviews vehicles from the cheapest to the most prestigious. Wrecking yards, dealer lots, garages, racetracks, professional automotive testing and automotive journalism - Nathan has experienced a wide range of the automotive spectrum. Brought up in the California car culture and educated in theater, childhood education, film, journalism and history, Nathan now lives with his family in Denver, CO. His words, good humor and video are enjoyed worldwide.